Evolution of Novo Nordisk Canada Social Media Campaign for Rx Product, Saxenda®

Whether you have ever tried to lose weight or not, most of us realize that there are peak times when people get motivated to take on the challenge.  And here we are in January, the time when approximately 1/3 of Canadians resolve to work on their fitness levels and nutrition (Source: Statista, Leading New Year’s Resolutions according to Canadians in 2017).

Novo Nordisk Canada understands the mindset of their target audience for Saxenda®, a weight loss prescription medication, and they play to it very well through their evolving Saxenda® social media campaign.  Below you will see how the Saxenda social media campaign started and how it evolved throughout the past 8 months.

May 2018:  Laying down the foundation

Novo Nordisk Canada sponsored Facebook ads promoting the fact that obesity was now considered a chronic illness by several medical organizations.  I only have screenshots of the French ads.  This was a great starting point to lay down the foundation for their upcoming campaigns for both of their prescription weight loss products, Ozempic® and Saxenda® .

June 2018:  Saxenda® Choose Change campaign

The Saxenda Choose Change campaign was launched on Facebook in June 2018.  Novo Nordisk Canada was sponsoring several Facebook ads which were obviously targeted to healthcare professionals, with a call-to-action asking the healthcare professional to watch their 59-second video.  The objective was to get healthcare professionals to start a discussion about obesity with the appropriate patients, with a message that obesity is a disease and is treatable.

The Saxenda Choose Change campaign was also targeted to overweight Canadians in a wide variety of Facebook ads, in both English and French.  The ads were designed to increase awareness of Saxenda and encourage interested Canadians to speak with their primary care physician about it.  With the frequent mentions of a resolution update, it appears that Novo Nordisk Canada was targeting patients who had tried to lose weight before but were unsuccessful.  It appears that the Saxenda Choose Change campaign was meant to re-inspire these patients.

The Saxenda Facebook ads directed Canadians to www.Saxenda.ca where they can learn more about how to speak with their doctor about Saxenda and obtain a discount for their first box of Saxenda.

September 2018: Back to Saxenda® campaign

Other than January, September seems to be a symbolic time for new beginnings for many people since it is the beginning of a new school year, and Novo Nordisk Canada spun that into their Saxenda campaign with a play-on-words focused on back-to-school; Back to Saxenda and First day of Saxenda.  They also maintained their Choose Change slogan for a few of their Facebook ads.  As you can see, their ads continued to target overweight men as well as overweight women.

Saxenda ads - 1
Saxenda ads - 2
Saxenda ads - 3

December 2018:  Now is the new later campaign

Fully aware that many people wait for January to take a resolution to lose weight, Novo Nordisk Canada sponsored Facebook ads to motivate overweight Canadians to take action now and not wait until January.  As marketers, we know how that last little push at year-end just might make the difference for a brand to reach its sales objectives for the year.

Late December 2018:  Countdown to new year resolution

And my personal favorite part of this campaign evolution so far was when Novo Nordisk Canada sponsored Facebook ads for a 3-day countdown to the new year.  A pharmaceutical company can have a bit of fun with its community just like a consumer company!  Understandably, some brands do not have that luxury because of the type of disease that they are associated with, but for certain brands like weight loss prescription products, it works beautifully.

Saxenda - new year countdown - 2 days v2 - error in ad
Saxenda - new year countdown - 2 days v1
Saxenda - new year countdown - 1 day

January 2019:  The Saxenda® resolution campaign

Novo Nordisk Canada is again playing on people’s need for a fresh start by encouraging overweight Canadians to make a new year’s resolution to talk to their doctor about Saxenda.

Playing by the rules:  Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) pharmaceutical advertising

Throughout the evolution of the Saxenda social media campaign, Novo Nordisk Canada played by the direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising guidelines which state that you can only refer to the product name, price or quantity.  You will notice that the ads targeted to patients mention the brand name Saxenda, but they do not mention any indication related to weight loss.  In the ads targeted to healthcare professionals, they have to be careful because even though these ads are not intended for patients, it is possible for a consumer to see it so they must be treated as a direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising ad.  And they are!  The ads either mention obesity or they mention the brand name Saxenda, but never both in the same ad.

Where to follow Novo Nordisk Canada:

You can find the Novo Nordisk Canada Facebook page here, although it is not used to communicate with the online community.  Its main purpose is just to be the anchor page for Facebook ads, which has been a requirement of Facebook for the past year or so.  However, their Twitter account posts more regularly, and you can find them on Twitter here.

Novo Nordisk Canada partnered with Media Platforms for their Saxenda® campaigns.

Saxenda® ads shown in this blog post are all owned by Novo Nordisk Canada.

Let us know what your thoughts are on the evolution of the Saxenda social media campaign in the comments below.

CCPE Comes out with a Roar on Facebook

CCPE-CFPCA little while ago, I wrote about what seemed to be a revival of the Council for Continuing Pharmaceutical Education (CCPE), at least when it comes to their online presence.  They had revamped their website and had an ad on Facebook boasting about their updated educational site.

The CCPE used to be so quiet online and on social media, but they seem to be coming out with a roar on Facebook these days!  Way to go CCPE !!!!  Your increased presence on Facebook is definitely noticeable!

It looks like the CCPE has recently (as spotted in December 2018) taken their Facebook presence one step further as they have multiple ads on Facebook targeting people who want a competitive advantage in the pharmaceutical market.  Their positioning and targeted audience are very clear from their ads.  The CCPE clearly wants to be recognized as the educational organization that can help boost one’s career within the pharmaceutical industry, whether one is trying to break into the industry or needs a competitive edge to stand out amongst their peers when it comes to career advancements.  Take a look at the screenshots of their most recent Facebook ads;

 

 

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I don’t know if the CCPE is advertising on other social platforms, but I think that Facebook is definitely a good spot to be advertising because those with or those hoping for a pharmaceutical career are like the general population – they are on Facebook.  Despite all of Facebook’s recent chaos and woes, it is still the number 1 social media platform for Canadians as can be seen by its page view share of 55.98% (Statcounter, Canadian social media statistics, November 2016 to November 2018).

statcounter - social media - Canada - Nov 2016 to Nov2018

Source: StatCounter Global Stats – Social Media Market Share

Kudos to CCPE for taking this plunge in Facebook advertising.  When we think of reaching out to pharmaceutical professionals, we think of LinkedIn, but I think we often overlook Facebook because it is where Canadians go to the most when it comes to social media.  And even though the targeted audience is probably on Facebook for personal reasons, their professional career hat is not far away, so the ads should be effective in reaching the appropriate audience.  I look forward to seeing if it pays off for CCPE in the future.

Do you think more companies should be reaching out to pharmaceutical employees via Facebook ads?  Let us know in the comments.

 

CCPE launches its new website

This week, a Facebook ad from the Council for Continuing Pharmaceutical Education (CCPE) appeared in my timeline, with the intention of promoting their new CCPE website.  I have been following the CCPE Facebook page and CCPE LinkedIn business page for years and they are a quiet bunch on social media, so I was really excited to see that they had sponsored a post on Facebook.  My guess is that they simply targeted their 74 Facebook followers. They may be testing their social media advertising opportunities.

At the time of writing this post, they did not have anything posted on their LinkedIn page and I could not find them on any other social media network.  Unfortunately, they do not promote their presence on social media on their website.  This might be because of their low activity on social media.  Personally, I would like to see them more active on social media because their service is valuable and I think a lot of young, Canadian pharmaceutical sales representatives and marketers can be found on various social sites. Their presence probably reflects that of the general Canadian population for their age group.

Here is a screenshot of the ad that the CCPE posted:

CCPE FB ad

Be sure to check out their new website, whether it is for yourself or more junior people that you are mentoring.

And while you’re at it, why not follow the CCPE on social media and let them know that Marketing 4 Health sent you: CCPE Facebook page and CCPE LinkedIn business page

Novo Nordisk Marketing Manager comments on the success of the Ozempic® social media advertising campaign

A few months ago, I spotted a Canadian pharmaceutical ad on Linked for the prescription product Ozempic®.  You can see my blog post about it here.  This was intriguing to me because it’s not every day that you see a prescription product promoted on LinkedIn, especially considering our Canadian regulations about direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising where you can only mention product name, quantity, and price.  But although this is technically considered a DTC ad since consumers are not blocked from seeing it and as such must follow Canadian DTC regulations, it is actually an ad targeting healthcare professionals.  Similar ads are currently ongoing on the Novo Nordisk Facebook page.  Note that Novo Nordisk does not post on their Facebook page, therefore it is probably just used as an anchor for their Facebook ads.

 

 

I asked Jeff Aikman, the Ozempic® Marketing Manager, for some feedback on the success of the Ozempic® social media advertising campaign. Here is his response:

 

Despite advancements in the diabetes treatment landscape, many people with type 2 diabetes still struggle to reach their hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) or blood glucose targets. Generally, clinical guidelines recommend an A1C goal of 7 per cent for most people.1

Healthcare professionals play a major role in helping patients and their caregivers understand their diagnosis and available treatment options. Helping patients understand the importance of the care plan for diabetes, and engaging them in the decision-making process strengthens the partnership between healthcare professionals and people living with diabetes. It can also promote a person’s understanding of, and adherence to, the treatment plan.2

Like all new products introduced into a market, it is important to build top of mind awareness, name recognition, and intrigue. When advertising online, the ads need to have a destination to click through if the viewer is interested in learning more.  In pharmaceutical advertising, the ads can only reference name, price, and quantity. Since these ads were targeted at HCPs using HCP language, the destination microsite must be gate protected and for HCPs only. We partnered with Media Platforms, an innovative healthcare advertising agency that specializes in reaching Healthcare Professionals and patients digitally, at a fraction of the cost of traditional advertising. At the launch of Ozempic® in Canada, we provided all HCPS with an opportunity to learn more about our newest Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Ozempic®, through an innovative online program. The program was designed to reach HCPs treating patients living with diabetes who were also looking to help their patients achieve their A1C goals. The digital advertising space provides us with a great platform to share compliant advertisements with HCPs quickly and effectively giving them the option to click through and receive more information.

The overall success of this program is still to be determined as it is ongoing, but we have seen some significant engagement with the content and direct follow up from physicians looking for more information. We are monitoring overall impressions, click through rates from the ads, and entrances through the gated site. Inside, HCPs can learn more about the medication and ask a question directly to our Medical Information team. Advertising through digital channels is an excellent cost effective way to get your name out there, providing HCPs the option to click through and learn more about the Canadian indication.

 

Note: Novo Nordisk is not a client.  I have not received any incentive to write this blog post.

 

References:

  1. Diabetes Canada. Clinical Practice Guidelines. Accessed on August 15, 2018 at http://guidelines.diabetes.ca/reduce-complications/a1ctarget
  2. Lau, David C.W.  MD, PhD, FRCPC. Snapshots of Diabetes Care in Canada. Canadian Journal of Diabetes. Accessed on August 15, 2018 https://www.canadianjournalofdiabetes.com/article/S1499-2671(13)01464-0/pdf

EpiPen Canada Facebook Page Advertises What? (Update – Issue has been fixed)

Update June 27 2018, 12:23 pm:  Pfizer Canada sent me an email to inform me that they have read my blog post and addressed the issue immediately.  They have removed the ads from the EpiPen Canada Facebook page.  I personally thank Pfizer Canada for taking my recommendation seriously and congratulate them for taking such speedy action.

________________________________________

One of my children needs to carry an EpiPen Junior all the time, so naturally, I follow the EpiPen Canada Facebook page.  I have always been impressed with the quality of their posts .

Despite my personal interest in the brand, I am a marketer at heart and I like checking out the ads on certain Facebook pages.  But this time, I came across an unusual situation.

Under the “Ads” tab of the EpiPen Canada Facebook page were ads for rheumatoid arthritis options and Pristiq, a prescription drug indicated for  the symptomatic relief of major depressive disorder.  For those who aren’t familiar with EpiPen, it is an epinephrine autoinjector for serious allergies.  There is no obvious relation between the EpiPen Facebook page or the two ads.

Imagine the confusion that people who see these ads on their Facebook timeline when they see that the ads come from the EpiPen Canada Facebook page yet are completely unrelated.

Epipen FB ad - RA

 

Epipen FB ad - Pristiq 1

 

Epipen FB ad - Pristiq 2

With such a strong focus on transparency when it comes to advertising, it seems odd to see the EpiPen Canada Facebook page advertise for other brands which belong to its parent company, Pfizer.

Where should these ads appear on Facebook?

Pfizer Canada, the distributor of EpiPen in Canada, has an active Facebook page.  It would have been more appropriate to run these advertisements from the Pfizer Canada Facebook page.  At the time when I saw the ads on the EpiPen Canada Facebook page, the Pfizer Canada Facebook page did not have any ads listed.

Pfizer Canada Facebook page

 

Why would EpiPen promote Rheumatoid Arthritis options and Pristiq?

Rationale 1:  Skirting regulatory guidelines?

Initially, I thought perhaps the company was trying to separate its ads from other related ads which may have been perceived as going against the direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertisement regulations by Health Canada.  For example, in Canada, pharmaceutical DTC can ONLY refer to a product’s name, price and quantity.  The moment you mention a disease as part of the ad, any mention of the product  name must be removed.  It’s one or the other, never both.

If a particular Facebook page were to advertise about a disease state in one ad, and at the same time advertise about the related product, that would probably get the company in trouble.  But this was NOT the case, since Pfizer Canada had no ads listed at all.  Phewfff!

Rationale 2: Human error?

Another rationale for this mix-and-match of ads on a Facebook page is that somebody probably just made a mistake, either by not realizing that the ads should have been on the Pfizer Canada Facebook page, or simply did not realize that they were placing the ads on the EpiPen Canada Facebook page

This would be particularly plausible if the agency handling the brands’ online and social advertising managed both the corporate social media as well as the social media for EpiPen.  But frankly, it seems to me that this could inadvertently happen for one ad, but for two?  Hmmm … probably not.

 

Rational 3: Corporate politics?

Pfizer is a very large company. Perhaps there was a lot of red tape to go through to get approval to place these ads under the overarching Pfizer Canada Facebook page so a decision was made to get the ads out quickly and to just go piggy-back off the EpiPen Facebook page. As marketers in any industry, we all need to be a bit creative sometimes.

Who knows why this happened. Perhaps I my guesses didn’t even come close.  Whatever the reason, I honestly do not believe that any ill intentions were involved.  Nonetheless, those ads should not remain under the EpiPen umbrella.

What should be done about these unrelated Facebook ads?

Although it is not the end of the world, having one brand advertise for a totally unrelated brand or disease state looks unprofessional.  It may also be perceived as unethical because it lacks transparency and it could be confusing to patients who see the ads on their Facebook timeline.

Just my two cents, but Pfizer Canada may want to consider deleting the unrelated ads from the EpiPen Canada Facebook page and reinstating them under the Pfizer Canada Facebook page, or creating separate, new Facebook pages that are specific for the individual ads.

What other interesting Facebook advertising scenarios have you come across?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prescription Drug Promoted on LinkedIn

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a prescription product promoted on LinkedIn.  Now I’m sure there have been some and I’ve just missed them, but since this was my first time seeing one, I thought that perhaps there might be others who haven’t seen this and would be interested in seeing an example.

This month, I have seen ads for Ozempic(R) by Novo Nordisk on LinkedIn on several occasions. Ozempic is an injectable prescription product which is indicated for the once weekly treatment of adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to improve glycemic control.  Here is the Canadian Ozempic product monograph by Novo Nordisk for those who would like more information about this product.

I have seen 2 versions of the Ozempic ad on LinkedIn. The wording and image (brand logo) are identical, except the layout is different.  You can see them below.  The ads are simple, but the mechanism used to communicate directly to healthcare professionals is creative:

Ozempic ad on LinkedIn v2

Ozempic ad on LinkedIn

Since LinkedIn is a public, non-gated site, any ads on this site would be considered direct-to-consumer advertising.  In Canada, when promoting a prescription product to the public in general, only the product name, price and quantity can be mentioned.  The Ozempic LinkedIn ads follow those regulations.

However, based on the verbiage of the ad, it is obvious that Novo Nordisk is not targeting consumers.  They are solely targeting Canadian physicians with this ad, but they still need to treat the ad as a direct-to-consumer ad since it could be viewed by consumers who could then click on the link.

The Ozempic website that one gets directed to when clicking on the ad is gated and can only be accessed by either a physician, nurse or pharmacist who can provide their licence number.  This is considered appropriate gating of a website by Health Canada.

Ozempic ad on LinkedIn - link to website ozempic.ca

I don’t have access to the views and clicks that Novo Nordisk is getting for these ads, but in general, most of us know that LinkedIn is a network for business people, and that includes healthcare professionals.  As such, I think it makes sense for Novo Nordisk to at least give LinkedIn a try for its advertising.  It is clearly an innovative means to get their message out to target healthcare professionals and the ad is implemented within the regulatory confines of the Canadian pharmaceutical industry.  Novo Nordisk may also be advertising on physician-specific sites such as Sermo and targeting Canadian physicians, but perhaps they are focusing on LinkedIn as a start since the advertising fees on Sermo are quite steep, however they can offer repetitive visibility to your specific target.

If you are managing a product that is targeted to healthcare professionals, don’t discard social media sites just because of regulatory restrictions.  You may have to test a few variations and different sites, but there is a way to communicate your message to your target audience.  Congratulations to Novo Nordisk for trying out a newer way of communicating directly with healthcare professionals.

A Pharmacy Facebook Party

I remember when my children were younger, it seemed like all the parenting blogs were hosting Twitter and Facebook parties to generate awareness and sales for their clients.  Maybe it’s just me, but I don’t see nearly as many Facebook or Twitter parties promoted as I used to.

But a few weeks ago, I saw a Shoppers Drug Mart Facebook party being promoted on Facebook.  I did not participate in the party, but since one of my objectives for this blog is to inspire healthcare organizations to use social media and digital marketing to reach their audience and achieve their objectives, I thought it would be worth posting a few screenshots of the Shoppers Drug Mart Facebook party.  See bottom of blog post.

The objective of the Shoppers Drug Mart Facebook party was to promote women’s mental health and to recruit women for their upcoming Run For Women event.  Very clever!

SDM RunForWomen FB ad

Shoppers Drug Mart promoted the hashtags #SHOPPERSLOVEYOU and #RunForWomen during the Facebook party.  If you are not familiar with hashtags, these are a great way to create a conversation and to help others find conversations about your topic.  According to Hashtagify.me, one of my favorite sites for tracking hashtag data, the #SHOPPERSLOVEYOU hashtag has a good momentum going on whereas the hashtag #RunForWomen had a slight increase for a couple of weeks, but now it is back to being flat and barely used.  Both hashtags have been tweeted mostly by Shoppers Drug Mart and other users tended to be concentrated in Canada.

ShoppersLoveYou hashtag

Shoppers Drug Mart has also been promoting their run for women via Facebook ads.

ShoppersLoveYou ad

Here are the screenshots of their Facebook party event invitation and a few others.  If ever your organization wants to create buzz around an event, why not try to host a Facebook and/or Twitter party.  It could be a great hook for your real objective.

SDM Facebook party 1SDM Facebook party - welcomeSDM Facebook party - thank you at endSDM Facebook party - FB story

Pfizer Uses Facebook Stories to Promote their Presence at Conference

Many physicians and medical suppliers attended the American College of Cardiology 2018 conference this past weekend.  To follow the conversation on social sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, follow the hashtag #ACC18 .

One of the participating suppliers cleverly used Facebook stories towards the end of the conference to summarize its key messages about stroke prevention and thanked the conference attendees for following the conversation.  I was not present at this conference, but since I like the Pfizer page, I was able to see thePfizer Facebook story on my homepage.  See the screen shots of the Pfizer Facebook story at the bottom of this post.

Back in the later part of 2017, Facebook opened up stories to Facebook pages.  Pages that post stories get featured on both mobile and desktop.  It is becoming more and more difficult for pages to get noticed on Facebook these days, and Facebook stories provides ideal real estate on its followers’ homepage.  Facebook stories are pretty hard to miss when you are on your homepage, which makes them a great opportunity to become visible again to an audience who may not see many of your posts anymore due to the new Facebook algorithm.  Just like any other type of advertisement, you need to be visible on a relatively frequent basis in order to achieve top of mind status with your audience, so you might want to consider posting a Facebook story on a daily basis.

Have you tried Facebook stories for pages yet?  If so, let us know about your experience.

Pfizer Facebook story from the 2018 ACC conference.Pfizer Facebook story from the 2018 ACC conference.Pfizer Facebook story from the 2018 ACC conference.Pfizer Facebook story from the 2018 ACC conference.

New! Approval Required for Medical Device Advertisements in Canada

A30365798_sds Standards has updated their advertising guidelines.

As of January 2, 2018, Canadian marketers must send their medical device advertisements through a review process with Ad Standards Clearance Services.  For more details, take a look the new Guidelines for Consumer Advertising of Health Products (for Nonprescription Drugs, Natural Health Products, Vaccines and Medical Devices).

Here are more details directly from the Ad Standards website:

Effective July 1, 2018, Telecaster Services of thinktv will require approval numbers for any new broadcast commercials. Previously aired commercials can continue to air until December 31, 2018, without requiring preclearance

The updated Guidelines, developed by Ad Standards Clearance Services in consultation with Health Canada and industry, are intended to help advertisers create advertising messages that meet all the relevant provisions of the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations, the Natural Health Products Regulations, the Medical Devices Regulations and other related Health Canada Policies and Guidelines. They replace the 2006 Consumer Advertising Guidelines for Marketed Health Products (for Nonprescription Drugs including Natural Health Products).

Marketed health products workshops

The Ad Standards Clearance Services team will be hosting workshops in Toronto on January 31 and in Montreal on February 15.  Both presentations will be in English.

The workshops will highlight key sections of the updated Guidelines and the dos and don’ts of advertising nonprescription drugs, natural health products, vaccines and medical devices. Though the Montreal workshop will be presented in English, the slides will also be available in French.

Click on the links below for more details on these workshops:

Marketed Health Products Workshop, Toronto – January 31
Marketed Health Products Workshop, Montreal – February 15

Bell Let’s Talk on Social Media

Bell Let's Talk

Bell Let’s Talk is a yearly initiative by Bell Canada that promotes open and frank discussion about mental health.  It’s been hugely successful and many celebrities have been involved in the campaign, thus helping Bell garner even more visibility for this worthy campaign.  Hats off to Bell Canada for sponsoring this campaign since 2010.  Bell Canada is on track to donating $100 million to mental health programs by the year 2020.

Setting up social media profiles to support such a campaign, which is not focused on selling products or services whatsoever, is a clever way of increasing one’s brand name visibility.  For example, the Bell Let’s Talk social media networks compared to the Bell Canada networks are as follows:

  Twitter followers Facebook page likes Instagram followers
Bell Let’s Talk 161K followers

 

 

236K on Facebook

 

 

 

14.7K on Instagram

 

 

Bell Canada 82K combined for @Bell and @BellSupport

 

171K (English and French page followers combined) 4.5K

There are approximately 40% more Bell Let’s Talk social media followers than there are Bell Canada followers.  That makes for 40% more people to hear about Bell Canada, even though it isn’t specifically about their products or services.  It is still a great way to get visibility and brand name recall.  As a result, even though the company is spending money to promote the Bell Let’s Talk campaign, gives millions in donations (which is tax write-off for the company at the end of the year) and does not receive any revenues for this particular campaign, many would say that the PR and brand visibility is well worth it.

This campaign truly does achieve its goal of enhancing communication about mental health as can be seen by the Google Trend chart for the search term “mental health” in Canada for the past 12 months.  You can see the January bump in data which indicates last year’s Bell Let’s Talk  initiative.  Search trends for the term “mental health” do not come close throughout the remainder of the year.

Mental Health Google trends in Canada - past 12 months

 

Here is the current portfolio of Facebook ads for the Bell Let’s Talk campaign, which are being promoted a couple of weeks before the actual event itself, which will take place on January 31 2018.  This year, the campaign is focused on the lives of 37 real people who are telling their story of mental health.  The ads all promote the event’s hashtag, #BellLetsTalk, and many of the ads consist of videos between 30 second and 1 1/2 minutes.  Several of them have a call-to-action to learn more, and by clicking on this button, you get brought to the Bell Let’s Talk webpage with details on the mental health stories included in the campaign.

We will continue to watch the Bell Let’s Talk campaign to see how it evolves on social media.  Stay tuned!

 

Note: I am not affiliated with Bell Let’s Talk, Bell Canada, nor the agency that developed the campaign. I’m just appreciating their work, and I enjoy learning from others’ campaigns.